Features

Rendez-vous With French Cinema – March 8-18

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This March, Rendez-Vous with French Cinema returns to Lincoln Center celebrating the  richness, originality, and craft of contemporary French filmmaking. The festival, organized by  Florence Almozini and Dennis Lim, runs from March 8th through the 18th. Senior Film Critic Kurt Brokaw offers insightful reviews of his favorites and information on screenings.

Review: What Is Love?

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Ryan Engley reviews the 2018 short “What Is Love?” by NYU Student Filmmaker Elle Rinaldi. The film scholar and critic praises Rinaldi’s complex treatment of love in the experimental, short form.

 

 

Ophelia Cast Discuss the Hamlet Revamp

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Farrah Kazemi interviews Director Claire McCarthy and Actors George MacKay and Tom Felton at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival. The group was assembled for the premiere of Ophelia, a film that reimagines the life of Shakespeare’s tragic maiden in the classic play Hamlet.  Ophelia stars MacKay as Hamlet and Felton as Laertes. McCarthy directed the film, which is based in part on a novel by Lisa Klein.

 

Women in Film Portraits: Kaliya Warren

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In this installment of Women in Film Portraits, Lauren Sowa interviews Kalyia Warren, the Writer/Director behind Expatriates—a love story that follows two multiracial dirt bike riders from Egypt to Cape Town. The film, now its final developments, was inspired by the people Warren I’ve met while traveling on the African continent. Warren is a graduate of NYU and is currently based in New York City.

Marketing a Low-Budget Indie Black Sci Fi Film

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Sharon Lewis is the creator behind the indie sci-fi film Black Girl Begins. In her debut piece for The Independent, Lewis writes about how she drew on energies of the under-served community of Afropunk women to market and distribute her film. She offers valuable advice to filmmakers on how to use social media and crowd funding as marketing and research tools, how to choose festivals wisely, and how to “re-define” a theatrical release. Brown Girl Begins is based on the award-winning novel Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson.

Women in Film Portraits: Natasha Kermani

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Women in Film Portraits is a series by Artist Lauren Sowa about up-and-coming female independent filmmakers. In this first installment, Lauren interviews Iranian-American Director Natasha Kermani about major themes in her work. Look for Women in Film Portraits interviews each month at The Independent. 

 

 

New York Jewish Film Festival – January 10-23

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The Jewish Museum and the Film Society of Lincoln Center have partnered again in producing the 27th annual New York Jewish Film Festival. The festival showcases films from around the world that explore the diversity of Jewish experience. The Independent’s Senior Film Critic, Kurt Brokaw, was at this year’s festival and shares his favorites from a thrilling lineup of documentary, narrative, and short forms.

Women In Film Portraits: A New Series

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Women in Film Portraits is a series by Lauren Sowa about supporting, cheering, helping, and connecting with up-and-coming creative artists. In an industry where female voices are still underrepresented, this project is timely and vital. The series will launch in January with a profile of Iranian-American Director Natasha Kermani.  New interviews will appear monthly at the magazine.

New Horizons of Virtual Reality: Exploring Utopia Through the Evolution of Second Life

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Annie Berman, named one of The Independent’s ten filmmakers to watch (2016), is a media artist living and working in New York City. Her background in photography and psychology inspires work about visual culture, virtual realities, and the changing media landscape. Her films, videos, performances, and installations have shown internationally including at the Museum of Modern Art’s Doc Fortnight, Rooftop Films, Galerie Patrick Ebensperger Berlin, Kassel Hauptbahnhof, and the Rome Independent Film Festival where she was awarded the Best Experimental Film Prize. Recently,  Annie spoke with The Independent’s editor about her newest VR project—an exploration of the possibilities and limitations of virtual reality through the aftermath of Second Life.

One difference between “Indie” and “Mainstream”: Money

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Senior Film Critic, Kurt Brokaw, reviews Phantom Thread, the new Paul Thomas Anderson movie
starring Daniel Day Lewis as a 50’s London dress-designer-to-royalty.  In the film, Lewis falls in love
with a simple country girl, makes her his muse, and then pushes her away–as he’s done to some many others. But she’s determined to hold on to him…… Find out why Brokaw recommends you see this Christmas Day opener.