Articles Tagged Making Films

Puerto Rico

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I did not come here to kill. I came here to die. – Lolita Lebrón On March 1, 1954, Lolita Lebrón and three men entered the United States House of Representatives armed with weapons. Her fist held high and wrapped in the flag of Puerto Rico, she fired four shots towards the ceiling in defense… Read more »

Beth Harrington

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It’s been said that every filmmaker secretly wants to be a rock star, and vice versa. Beth Harrington has been both. In what she calls “a former lifetime,” she performed with Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers. She’s since worked on an array of documentary programs, from NOVA to Frontline to Health Quarterly. But her… Read more »

The Women Behind the Camera

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This was going to be the last article ever on woman cinematographers. It shouldn’t be news in 2003 that women are making movies—gorgeous, stunning, provocative movies—and with Ellen Kuras shooting big-budget Hollywood films like Analyze That, can anyone still argue that the gaze is male? But consider this: According to the annual “Celluloid Ceiling” study… Read more »

Should I script my documentary?

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Dear Doc Doctor: I’m shooting abroad and want to make sure I don’t miss anything since I can’t go back to reshoot. Is there a way I can know the “story” or “script” of my documentary in advance? You would be better off investing your time in learning a meditation technique than trying to write… Read more »

Getting To Know Lisanne Skyler

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Lisanne Skyler has been pretty busy lately. Between trips to European film festivals with her first narrative feature, Getting to Know You, and a move into a new apartment in Los Angeles, she’s also been cranking away on an edit of a new feature-length documentary. Finding time to talk in person about the path leading… Read more »

Land of Enchantment

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The filmmaking industry began in New Mexico as early as 1898 when an inventor named Thomas Edison arrived in the dusty desert with his newfangled "camera" to capture flickering images of Isleta Pueblo schoolchildren for the short Indian Day School. Since then, the Land of Enchantment has been home to hundreds of productions, big and… Read more »

From Mags and Gates to Bits and Chips

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In 1976, Jean-Luc Godard began dreaming of a 35mm camera that would be small enough to fit into the glove compartment of a car. He wanted a camera, in other words, that he could cart along and use to shoot images spontaneously, as he came across them, rather than have bulky equipment determine the time… Read more »

Something Old, Something New: Archival Research Online

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In the olden days (three or four years ago) producers in search of film footage of a particular subject–say, Alfred Hitchcock–would call a series of archives to find out if they had any. If so, the producer/researcher would go to the archive to look through hours of videotape. If the project was about, say, the… Read more »

thefutureishere.com

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Documentary filmmakers often struggle for years doing whatever it takes to finish our labors of love, only to find one roadblock after another thrown up between the completed work and the audience we know is out there. Now comes the Internet, with its extraordinary power to target and reach potential viewers, as well as broadband,… Read more »