Series

10 to Watch: 2018 Nominating Jury

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For 10 years now The Independent has been tooting the horn for indie filmmakers everywhere with our annual 10 to Watch. Read on about how to help us in our 10 for 10 year by nominating a filmmaker. We want to hear the stories of characters who often hide in the shadows of cinema. We will post our list this spring.

The Global Screen: Thomas Britt

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In this second installment of The Global Screen, Thomas Britt writes about the work of Jonas Cuarón. In some ways,  Cuarón’s Desierto (2015) can be seen as a timely political film, involving border disputes, contested spaces, and dispossession. The film’s heroes and villain feel alienated from their right relationship to the land. In this article, Britt considers the influence of action and horror genres on the film, specifically the ways in which 1970s genre films and Australian “Outback horror” provide a comparable narrative framework that Cuarón deftly updates in his film about violence and lines in the sand.

Women in Film Portraits: Danielle Eliska Lyle

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In this installment of Women in Film Portraits, Lauren Sowa profiles Danielle Eliska Lyle, a writer, filmmaker, and photographer from Detroit. As a “black archivist,” Danielle’s life work is to tell stories (written, filmed, and photographed) of powerful women, the black diaspora, and the state of black culture. Danielle has gained notable screenwriting recognition and many awards. Her infectious spirit and passion for creative storytelling are palpable; read on!

 

Women in Film Portraits: Alicia Slimmer

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In this installment of Women in Film Portraits, Lauren Sowa profiles Alicia Slimmer, Director of the Award-Winning narrative feature Creedmoria. Slimmer discusses the making of the film, its musical influences, and its festival run. In addition, Slimmer shares lessons learned in Directing Creedmoria and offers advice to women working in the film industry today. Creedmoria will be released May 18th on Amazon, iTunes, and Google Play.

The Global Screen: Isaac Rooks

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In this first installment of The Global Screen essay series, Isaac Rooks writes about Shin Jeong-won’s gruesome farce, Chaw, which Rooks suggests offers more than the spectacle of a giant boar slaughtering drunken revelers at a karaoke celebration. In this essay, Rooks explores how Shin’s film utilizes practical and conceptual resources from around the world to address global audiences about common concerns.

Women in Film Portraits: Caroline Mariko Stucky

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In this installment of Women in Film Portraits, Lauren Sowa profiles Caroline Mariko Stucky, an award-winning, Swiss-Japanese filmmaker and cinematographer with a fierce passion for American culture. For Caroline, film is the ultimate language. It surpasses the kaleidoscope of spoken languages that informed her childhood. In this interview, Caroline shares about coming to the United States and about taking on a predominantly male creative roles.

The Global Screen: An Essay Series on Contemporary World Cinema

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The Independent announces The Global Screen, a series of bi-monthly essays written by film scholars and academics interested in engaging with our readership of filmmakers, directors, artists, and activists. The series is edited by Dr. Jayson Baker, Assistant Professor in Communications at Curry College. In this introduction, Dr. Baker provides a summary of the series and a context for its purpose at this time. Essays in The Global Screen will be published over the course of the year, beginning at the end of March.

Women in Film Portraits: Kaliya Warren

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In this installment of Women in Film Portraits, Lauren Sowa interviews Kalyia Warren, the Writer/Director behind Expatriates—a love story that follows two multiracial dirt bike riders from Egypt to Cape Town. The film, now its final developments, was inspired by the people Warren I’ve met while traveling on the African continent. Warren is a graduate of NYU and is currently based in New York City.

Women in Film Portraits: Natasha Kermani

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Women in Film Portraits is a series by Artist Lauren Sowa about up-and-coming female independent filmmakers. In this first installment, Lauren interviews Iranian-American Director Natasha Kermani about major themes in her work. Look for Women in Film Portraits interviews each month at The Independent. 

 

 

Women In Film Portraits: A New Series

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Women in Film Portraits is a series by Lauren Sowa about supporting, cheering, helping, and connecting with up-and-coming creative artists. In an industry where female voices are still underrepresented, this project is timely and vital. The series will launch in January with a profile of Iranian-American Director Natasha Kermani.  New interviews will appear monthly at the magazine.