Reviews

Advance Look at New Directors/New Films

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For the past 38 years in Manhattan, The Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Museum of Modern Art have collaborated on an annual presentation of New Directors/New Films. This year’s 27 features and 11 shorts, representing 20 countries, will screen at both locales between March 24th and April 4th. Many events host directors for… Read more »

Best of New Directors/New Films: The Man Next Door

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The Man Next Door (El hombre de al lado) (Mariano Cohn & Gastón Duprat. 2009. Argentina. 103 min.) Nobody loves movies about the neighbor-from-hell more than a New Yorker, because we live with so many of them. This one’s a keeper. Imagine you’re residing in a drop-dead showplace actually designed by the famed Swiss/French architect,… Read more »

Doc Highlights from the Festival du Nouveau Cinéma

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You may want to check out part one, which offers a festival overview with a focus on its narrative features. It’s always fun identifying the docs in a festival like the FNC, where, often, they’re not clearly billed as such. The story is the thing, and as narratives take on documentary qualities and vice-versa, the… Read more »

Under-the-radar Features from the Festival du Nouveau Cinéma

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If you’ve never been to Montréal, Québec you’re missing out. With cheap rent, creative industries, and multiculturalism seeping out all of its pores, this port city is crawling with artsy & cinematic characters from the très hip to the downright derelict, a cross between Brooklyn, New Orleans, Marseilles and maybe Istanbul. Summer is tropical and… Read more »

The Transformation of Television

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Joost, Hulu and boxee – one thing is for sure, names like the American Broadcasting Company (aka ABC) are a thing of the past. Instead, the future of broadcasting is filled with silly-named companies that aim to overthrow your idea of television. I must disclose my bias – this past summer my husband and I… Read more »

Q&A – Larry Clark

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Larry Clark’s films are shocking. There’s Kids, about drug-using, AIDS-carrying, sexually active Manhattan teenagers; Bully, the true story of a group of teens who murder their tormentor; and Ken Park, which was so sexually explicit, it was never released in the U.S. These films are shocking because they capture a reality most people don’t want… Read more »

Guys on Girls on Film

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From time to time there is a banner year for female characters. A great fuss is made about how movie-land has changed, allowing women into a club that hadn’t previously given them more than a handful of meaty roles at a time. 2005 was not one of those years. Most of the movies that earned… Read more »

On The Scene

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In the heart of San Francisco’s Japantown at the Radisson Miyako Hotel, a roomful of filmmakers and community activists celebrated the 25th anniversary of a not-for-profit organization that funds, exhibits, and distributes Asian Pacific American film. The National Asian American Telecommunications Association or NAATA has much to celebrate: It has literally changed the face of… Read more »

Is documentary the new memoir?

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I am a sociologist who conducts historical research on race and social policy, so my work has something in common with a documentary filmmaker’s attempt to uncover some version of “the truth” (however defined). Maybe this is just my sociological training leaking out, but when I watch a documentary—especially a highly personal, idiosyncratic one—I want… Read more »

Kara Walker at REDCAT

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At the opening reception for Kara Walker’s multimedia project “Song of the South” at downtown LA’s REDCAT Gallery, the artist adopted the eerily detached voice of a little girl playing with her dolls. “Help us! Help us!” she cried while perched behind a semitransparent screen maneuvering little shadow puppets that had been overcome by a… Read more »