Features

“Scores of ‘Starlets’ Like Me… Fifty Bucks a Week’’

By

In the 1940s, two female intellectuals, coming from very different positions, began to theorize gender and economy in studio Hollywood. In this fourth series installment, Kerry McElroy delves into the changing and ironic state of affairs for actresses in the 1940s— unexpected autonomy and worsening exploitation. Food restriction, forced cosmetic surgery, suspensions, and poverty were largely the order of the tyrannical day. McElroy also looks at the last living Golden-Age star, Olivia de Havilland, and her landmark 1943 court case on contracts and suspensions.

Women in Film Portraits: Naomi McDougall Jones

By

In this installment of Women in Film Portraits, Lauren Sowa profiles award-winning Actress, Writer, Producer, and Activist Naomi McDougall Jones. Naomi wrote, produced, and starred in the 2014 indie feature film, Imagine I’m Beautiful, which took home 12 awards on the film festival circuit including 4 Best Pictures and, for Naomi, 3 Best Actress Awards and The Don Award for Best Independently Produced Screenplay of 2014. Naomi speaks with Sowa about her new film Bite Me and about being a female storyteller.

 

 “This Is the Action of a Very Naughty Young Lady”

By

The 1930’s saw the studio system in peak Fordist condition, especially in terms of its financial and bodily control over women. “Glamour” was the disciplinary strategy of the day, and the most famous women stars of the twentieth century learned to negotiate it in new ways. In this third series installment, Kerry McElroy looks at race, queerness, and economic disadvantage in Depression-era Hollywood. Women like Mae West created new channels of power, attaining international stardom and unfathomable wealth in the process. Bette Davis, on the other hand, brought forth a watershed court case for actors’ rights, and demonstrated just how much the industry feared political agitation and class consciousness.

New York Film Festival Sept. 28-Oct.14

By

Senior Film Critic Kurt Brokaw views the entire main slate plus all shorts in the
56th New York Film Festival Sept. 28-Oct.14. Read critic’s choice reviews on
his top favorites which will post in one continuing article over the next three weeks.

“The Profession is Crowded Now”

By

After a halcyon decade of growth and promise for women in Hollywood, patriarchal, hyper-capitalism closed like a vise around the industry. With this second series installment, Kerry McElroy explores Los Angeles in the 1920s. Women migrating west in large numbers represented an exciting cultural phenomenon but also a social problem that needed to be regulated. Just as the “casting couch” was becoming an entrenched industrial practice, a notorious rape trial shocked the industry and re-victimized women. In the midst of these grim developments, a few actresses did manage to become global, superstars, amassing real wealth.

Hollywood Was a Matriarchy

By

To understand the current #MeToo/Time’s Up moment, we must reckon with a century of Hollywood’s mistreatment of women. With this first series installment, Kerry McElroy takes us back to the industry’s earliest decade in Los Angeles. This was a time of surprising feminine power. Cinema emerged alongside the New Woman, utopian promises of California, the stunt queen, and global female celebrity. It took time for capitalist forces to reassert a gendered order.

Rewind!: Scott Rosenberg and Con Air

By

In early August, as part of their “Rewind!” series, the Coolidge Corner Theater in Brighton, MA held a special 35mm screening of the 1997 film Con Air, followed by a Q&A with screenwriter Scott Rosenberg. Like all the special events held by the Coolidge, it was great fun for fans of the movie and a special treat for those coming to Con Air for the first time. The Independent’s Mike Sullivan was at the event and shares this review.

New Series: Bette, Marilyn, and #MeToo

By

Kerry McElroy announces a timely and compelling series that will run bi-monthly this fall at The Independent. The series titled, “Bette, Marilyn, and #MeToo: What Studio-Era Actresses Can Teach Us About Economics and Resistance Post-Weinstein,” highlights Hollywood legends (including Olivia de Havilland, Louise Brooks, Marilyn Monroe, and Elizabeth Taylor) who all carved out spaces of autonomy in a decidedly male-controlled film industry at the height of its exploitative powers. McElroy will reveal, through analysis that spans seven decades, what these actresses have to teach us in this contemporary moment of feminist reckoning.

Women in Film Portraits: Joanna Pickering

By

In this installment of Women in Film Portraits, Lauren Sowa profiles Joanna Pickering, a New York based filmmaker and activist who has worked in television, film, stage, and radio. Joanna has made over 20 independent films and is currently co-starring in Pelleas. Joanna talks with Sowa about this project and about her many collaborations with inspiring creative women.