Articles Tagged Sundance

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Sundance Coverage: The Fire This Time

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With its kitchen-sink realism and cinematographer Ante Cheng’s moody, black-and-white camerawork, the filmmaker’s quasi-autobiographical Gook stems from his childhood memories about his father defending the family business during 1992’s Los Angeles riots following the notorious, not-guilty verdicts of the four LAPD officers involved in the 1991 beating of the late Rodney King.

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All for One, One for All: Laps

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Three filmmaking musketeers, writer-director Charlotte “Charlie” Wells, producer Joy Jorgensen, and editor Blair McClendon, enrolled in the Masters of Fine Arts program at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, put their heads together to create the short film Laps. It premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival.

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A Love Triangle in Hell

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After a post-screening Q&A session, Cabral, 28, spoke to Neil Kendricks about his risky modus operandi and tackling the challenging logistics of filming on location in the Najayo prison where approximately 70,000 prisoners are crammed into a facility built for 20,000 inmates. Sometimes, art can emerge from the most unlikely places.

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From the Archives: Suburbia’s mean streets enter “Girls Town” (1996)

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Twenty years ago Independent contributor Dana Harris sat opposite filmmakers Jim McKay and Lauren Zalaznick in a Soho coffee shop to talk Girls Town, the duo’s comedy-drama that embraced improv to explore the lives of teenage girls. Two decades have passed — with McKay going on to direct episodes of The Wire, Big Love, and Law & Order and Zalaznick going on to be an accomplished television executive — but this interview preserves a moment in which the two explore a new dimension for women in film.

Nate Parker took Sundance by storm with his depiction of Nat Turner in The Birth of a Nation (courtesy Fox Searchlight).

Sundance 2016: Where Black Lives Matter

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Slave rebellion, a romance for the history books, and girls being their odd, tough selves combine for one potent antidote to Hollywood’s dearth of black lives on screen. Credit goes to Sundance 2016, according to staff writer Neil Kendricks, who says this festival “defiantly flies a multi-racial flag of true diversity.”

From Kahil Joseph's "Double Conscience" video installation at Sundance 2016's New Frontier section. (Photo by Neil Kendricks)

Sundance 2016: New Frontier’s VR Spectacles

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In its 10th year, Sundance’s New Frontier section abounded with cutting edge technology and immersive, VR experiences. Neil Kendricks and Maddy Kadish wore the headsets, goggles, and assorted cutting-edge tech in order to leave Park City momentarily behind and glimpse the future of storytelling.

A still from the documentary Newtown (courtesy Sundance Film Festival)

Sundance 2016: Films On Gun Violence

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What has been an absence of cinematic dialogue about gun access and violence in the United States was filled with both documentaries and fiction features at Sundance 2016. The Independent’s Maddy Kadish and Neil Kendricks debate the merits and emotional impact of several titles.

An art concept image from 1979 Revolution. Photo courtesy Ink Stories.

10 Filmmakers to Watch in 2015: Navid Khonsari and Vassiliki Khonsari

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Game developer Navid Khonsari and filmmaker Bessie Khonsari join our 10 to Watch list with a genre-merging project, 1979 Revolution, a video game that aims to evoke the empathy of film. Navid and Bessie Khonsari participated in the New Frontier Story Lab at the Sundance Institute in 2014 and 1979 Revolution appeared as an exhibit in Sundance Film Festival’s New Frontier and at SXSW in 2015.